eLetters

80 e-Letters

published between 2003 and 2006

  • Authors' reply to: A blue bird flying across the blue sky
    Riitta-Sisko Koskela

    Dear Editor,

    We thank Mr. Wenbin Liang for comments on our paper.

    The first part of the comments concerned criticism on our Figure 1 and handling of exposure data. Our Figure 1 is a schematic drawing. It was aimed only to portray how the explanatory variables precede the response variables in our two-stage model. The purpose of our study was not to investigate does "dust exposure increase the risk of IHD a...

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  • Re: Job constraints and arterial hypertension
    Wenbin Liang

    Dear Editor,

    “Job strain” may be associated with unhealthy diet pattern, which usually includes high sodium intake—a major risk factor of hypertension. Moreover, high sodium intake is always associated with high fat and high energy intake, and further associated with high BMI level.

    Therefore, it would be interesting to see whether there is any association between “Job constraints” and overweight among th...

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  • Mortality or incidence?
    Kenneth Campbell

    Dear Editor,

    In their paper entitled “Risk of lymphatic or haematopoietic cancer mortality with occupational exposure to animals or the public”, Svec et. al.[1] clearly imply that they believe mortality is an acceptable surrogate for incidence of haematological malignancy in this study group. Although they offer certain caveats regarding this approach, they ignore the greatest potential confounder. Patients with...

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  • A blue bird flying across the blue sky
    Wenbin Liang

    Dear Editor

    Exposure period is as important as the dose of exposure

    Based on Figure 1 in the article[1], it could be inferred that the timing of dust exposure would be crucial when investigating whether “Dust exposure” would increase the risk of IHD among patients who already had Respiratory diseases: The dust exposure of most interest would be the exposure after the occurrence of the respiratory dise...

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  • The validity of self-reported measures of mould/dampness
    Helen C Francis

    Dear Editor

    In an interesting study published in the September 2005 issue of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Simoni and collegues reported the relation between mould and/or dampness exposure and respiratory disorders in children and adolescents in Italy [1]. The authors concluded that wheeze and asthma can often be explained by exposure to home mould and dampness, particularly in early life.

    ...
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  • Authors' reply
    Katja Kojo

    Dear Editor,

    We thank Dr. Rafnsson[1] for valuable comments on our paper.[2] Rafnsson finds our policy implications surprising. In the light of present evidence, we do not find further measures justified for reducing radiation exposure among cabin crew. The justification for this view is the fact that exposure limits common for all radiation workers, also apply for the cabin crew. Dose monitoring indicates that the...

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  • Is gestational week at birth an important marker of the impact of ambient air pollution?
    Koji Nishijima

    Dear Editor,

    We read with great interest the article by Mannes et al., which related the adverse effects of ambient air pollution on birth weight.[1] That article well described the effects of pollutant exposure on the risk of low birth weight using a marker of small for gestational age (SGA). However, that study presents some shortcomings.

    First, gestational week at birth is obstetrically and sociall...

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  • Health hazards of ethyleneglycol ethers
    Heikki Savolainen

    Dear Editor,

    The report on the occupational health risks of ethylene glycol ethers is convincing while using the time-honoured indicators of female reproductive health.[1]

    The effects often coincide with or depend on nervous system toxicity of e.g. solvents. The toxic effect of the ethylene glycol ethers seems to stem from their end metabolites, the corresponding alkoxyacetic acids. They seem to be inhibit...

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  • Retrospective assessment of exposure
    Vilhjalmur Rafnsson

    Dear Editor,

    Kojo et al. [1] report their results on breast cancer risk among airline cabin attendants in a nested case-control study. Increased incidence of breast cancer has been repeatedly found among Finnish and other airline cabin attendants and that is the motive of the study. The results do not support the hypothesis that cosmic radiation exposure as measured in the study is strongly linked to the inductio...

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  • Epidemiological Perspectives on Silica and Health - Report from an International Workshop
    Lesley Rushton

    Dear Editor,

    Kyle Steenland raises some interesting points in his commentary on silica [1] both on our papers reporting exposure assessment and mortality in the UK silica sand industry [2,3] and on the adverse effects of silica in general.

    With the exception of one quarry, where other exposures such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons could have occurred, no relationship was found with cumulative silica ex...

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