eLetters

74 e-Letters

published between 2000 and 2003

  • Predictions of mortality from mesothelioma
    Geoffrey Berry

    Dear Editor

    The update of predictions of mortality from pleural mesothelioma in the Netherlands [1] provides welcome news that the peak number and the total during 2000-2028 is now predicted to be only a little more than half of the figures predicted only four years earlie.[2] This marked change in prediction has occurred because the known decrease in asbestos use after 1984 and a ban in 1993 were taken into account...

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  • Trace anaesthetic gases and multiple sclerosis
    Diana G Mcgregor

    Dear Editor

    We would like to comment on the study by Flodin et al.[1] We believe it has multiple methodological flaws and does not add to the understanding of the relationship of exposure to trace concentrations of waste anesthetic gases and the health of operating room workers.

    First, the method of data collection, i.e, by an “appeal” (authors’ word)” in a trade journal for nurses for individ...

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  • Response to Letter by Kromhout and van Tongeren
    Roy M. Harrison

    Dear Editor

    In commenting on our paper published recently in OEM,[1] Kromhout and van Tongeren admonish us for paying insufficient attention to the earlier literature on occupational pollutant exposures. Whilst no doubt an element of their criticism is justified, we feel that the exposure situation for the general public is sufficiently different that it should not be assumed that findings in the occupational...

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  • Mortality results for polyurethane manufacture understated
    Franklin E. Mirer

    Dear Editor

    Sorahan and Nichols,[1] writing in this journal, incorrectly understate the strength of evidence for work-related increased mortality among their cohort of production workers in the UK flexible polyurethane foam industry. Their study actually found “some” evidence for a work-related increase in all-cause mortality, respiratory disease mortality, and lung cancer mortality in this exposure circumstance,...

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  • Epidemiological study of workers at two California petroleum refineries 1950-95; a reply
    Kenneth P Satin

    Dear Editor

    Parodi et al. raised several comments on our cohort mortality study of petroleum refinery workers in California.[1] Their comments are general in nature and apply to most, if not all, occupational cohort mortality investigations in general and refinery studies in particular, including such studies conducted in the US, the UK, Canada and Italy.[2-7] We have discussed the same issues in our original...

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  • Comments on article by Satin et al
    Stefano Parodi

    Dear Editor

    We would like to comment on the paper by Satin et al, [1] which reports an update of a mortality investigation on two cohorts of petroleum refinery workers. The Authors claim that one of the major aims of their study was the assessment of “health risks relative to more contemporary levels of exposure and work environments”. Nevertheless, they explicitly admit that a previous investigation in such...

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  • Comments on article by Harrison et al and editorial by Cherrie
    Hans Kromhout

    Dear Editor

    The paper by Harrison et al.[1] and the accompanying editorial by Cherrie [2] address the important issue of personal exposure assessment (of air pollutants) in environmental epidemiology. After reading both papers we would like to make some comments with regard to the design, conduct and statistical analysis of the study by Harrison et al. and at the same time answer the question raised by...

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  • Generalised estimating equations and low back pain: a response to Hoogendoorn et al.
    Elaine F Harkness

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the article by Hoogendoorn et al. (2002) who examined the use of different approaches to analysing data from their prospective cohort study of work-related exposures and the future onset of low back pain.[1]

    Exposures and outcomes are time dependent factors as they are subject to change over time. The strength of the relationship depends on the assumptions of time depend...

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  • TABLE 1 (Part i): Harkness et al response to Hoogendoorn et al.
    Elaine F Harkness

    Table 1(i): Work-related mechanical risk factors and new onset low back pain*

    ...

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  • TABLE 1 (Part ii) Harkness et al. response to Hoogendoorn et al.
    Elaine F Harkness

    Table 1(ii): Work-related mechanical risk factors and new onset low back pain*
    Univariate associations

     ...

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