eLetters

74 e-Letters

published between 2000 and 2003

  • Aetiology of Parkinson's disease: genetic, environmental factors, or both?
    Mohamed Farouk Allam

    Dear Editor

    The aetiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) remains unknown, despite the elapse of more than 185 years since the description of the disease by James Parkinson in 1817.[1] Niehaus and Lange[2] suggested that environmental endotoxin, lipopolysaccaride produced by salmonella minnesota, might be a risk factor for PD. The authors' conclusions were based on experimental studies and few case reports.

    I thin...

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  • Quantitative risk assessment of silicosis death for quartz exposed German workers
    Yi Sun

    Dear Editor

    In a recent article of Occupational and Environmental Medicine [1], Mannetje and co-workers presented quantitative evidence of an exposure- response relationship between occupational exposure to crystalline silica and silicosis mortality in a carefully designed pooled analysis. This paper impressively demonstrated that simple silicosis, one of the oldest occupational diseases, is still a relevant occup...

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  • Re: Earlier study on asbestos workers, ILO scores and oxygenation
    Y C Gary LEE

    Dear Editor,

    We read the letter from Dr Smith with interest and thank him for suggesting his paper for discussion. Dr Smith argued that (i) there was significant overlap between his study [1] and ours [2], and (ii) oxygen desaturation as measured by pulse oximetry was an inappropriate means for testing exercise desaturation. We strongly disagreed with both points.

    (i) Our study and that of Smith and...

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  • Earlier study on asbestos workers, ILO scores and oxygenation more comprehensive
    Dorsett D Smith

    Dear Editor

    The publication of "Radiographic (ILO) readings predict arterial oxygen desaturation during exercise in subjects with asbestosis" by YCG Lee et al. from the Sir Charles Gardiner Hospital in Perth [1] presents no new information and fails to reference an earlier paper on the same subject which included more patients with clinical asbestosis and four different control groups.[2] This paper actually m...

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  • Re: Applying static air samples to epidemiological studies are related
    John H. Lange

    Dear Editor

    The letter [1] by Professor Cherrie in this issue addresses the long-standing question as to whether static (area, stationary) samples can be used to estimate exposure to people in lieu of personal measurements for epidemiological investigations. In my previous letter [2] the question was ask “are personal and static samples related?” and Cherrie [1] answered this question as “yes”. As mentioned in my...

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  • Personal and static samples measurements are related
    John W Cherrie
    Dear Editor

    The paper from Harrison and his co-workers [1] and the subsequent correspondence by Lange and others [2,3] has re-ignited a debate about the relationship between personal and static sample measurements that started more than 40 years ago.

    In 1957, the personal sampling pump had just been invented by Jerry Sherwood and Don Greenhalgh from the UK Atomic Energy Authority.[4] They compared their new persona...

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  • Use of personal exposure modeling in risk assessment of air pollutants
    Prem S Sarin

    Dear Editor

    Kromhout and van Tangeren [1] raise important issues regarding the papers by Cherrie [2] and Harrison et al.[3] The major shortcomings of the paper by Harrison et al.[3] are the small size of the sample (6 subjects each) used in the extrapolation of results. The three groups studied were the children, elderly and subjects with preexisting disease. The sample size in the disease categor...

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  • Respiratory effects of volcanic emissions
    Anna L Hansell

    Dear Editor

    Although at least 455 million people worldwide live within potential exposure range of a volcano active within recorded history,[1] surprisingly little primary epidemiological research on health effects of volcanic emissions has been published. The research by Forbes et al.[2] on the respiratory effects of the eruptions in Montserrat is therefore very welcome. However, more studies are neede...

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  • Author's response
    Alberto Ruano-Ravina

    Dear Editor

    The scientific literature is full of of papers and ideas giving hypothesis. This was the objective of our letter. As it is stated at the end, we do not know if the finding is consistent or due to chance. We think that there are reasons pointing that our findings could have a solid fundament;

    1) There were no musicians among the controls,
    2) the musicians among the cases were win...

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  • Ex-smokers got lung cancer?
    Philip A. Geis

    Dear Editor

    How is it significant that two ex-smokers got lung cancer - whether or not they played wind instruments? Were these musicians the only ex-smokers of the 130+ lung cancer sufferers? Did/do these musicians play in smoke- filled bars?

    With no wind instrument musicians in the control group and the confounding factor of being ex-smokers, the authors certainly should have provided better reason for...

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