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Original research
Sleep quality and military training injury during basic combat training: a prospective cohort study of Chinese male recruits
  1. Yi Ruan1,2,
  2. Xin Yu3,
  3. Huan Wang1,2,
  4. Bin Zou1,2,
  5. Wen-juan Song4,
  6. Wei Gu1,2,
  7. Chang-quan Ling1,2
  1. 1School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Naval Medical University (Second Military Medical University), Shanghai, China
  2. 2Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Changhai Hospital, Naval Medical University (Second Military Medical University), Shanghai, China
  3. 3The Navy Training Base, Eastern Theater Command, Shanghai, China
  4. 4Physical Examination Center, Changhai Hospital, Naval Medical University (Second Military Medical University), Shanghai, China
  1. Correspondence to Professor Chang-quan Ling, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Naval Medical University (Second Military Medical University), Shanghai 200433, China; changquanling{at}smmu.edu.cn; Professor Wei Gu, School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Navy Medical University (Second Military Medical University), Shanghai, China; sam6116{at}163.com; guweismmu{at}163.com

Abstract

Objective To examine the association between sleep quality and military training injury (MTI) in recruits during basic combat training (BCT).

Methods Participants were new recruits undergoing 12-week military BCT in China. Sleep quality was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) . Participants were classified into two groups based on their sleep quality (group 1, good sleep, PSQI score <7; group 2, poor sleep, PSQI score ≥7) at the start of BCT. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to test whether baseline PSQI score was associated with MTI incidence during BCT.

Results A total of 563 participants were included. The incidence of MTI was significantly lower in group 1 (48/203, 23.6%) than in group 2 (150/360, 41.7%) (p<0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds of MTI were 2.307 times higher in group 2 than in group 1 without adjusting for confounders: OR=2.307, p<0.001. When the model was adjusted for age, ethnicity, educational level and family income (OR=2.285) or for the previous confounders plus body mass index (OR=2.377), the results were similar (both p<0.001). Analysis of the types of initial MTI showed that group 2 had about 2.1 times higher odds of soft tissue injury than group 1 (p<0.001 in all the three models).

Conclusion Sleep quality before BCT influences the incidence of MTI, especially of soft tissue injury.

  • hygiene / occupational hygiene
  • occupational health practice
  • injury
  • risk assessment
  • sleep
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Footnotes

  • YR, XY and HW contributed equally.

  • Contributors WG and CQL designed the hypotheses and the experiments. YR, XY, HW, BZ and WJS were responsible for data collection. YR and WG participated in data analysis. All authors participated in data interpretation and manuscript review and writing. All authors contributed to the scientific discussion of the data and of the manuscript.

  • Funding This study was supported by National Science and Technology Major Project of China (No: 2018ZX09J18110-003-002).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval This study was approved by the Shanghai Changhai Hospital Ethics Committee (No: 2018–048), in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement Data are available upon reasonable request. The dataset of this study is available from authors at any time by email. We keep all the original files of this study.

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