Article Text

Download PDFPDF
Original research
Effects of dietary patterns on driving behaviours among professional truck drivers: the mediating effect of fatigue
  1. Yan Ge1,2,
  2. Shanshan He1,
  3. Yan Xu1,
  4. Weina Qu1,2
  1. 1 CAS Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China
  2. 2 Department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China
  1. Correspondence to Dr Weina Qu, CAS Key Laboratory of Behavioural Science, Institute of Psychology CAS, Beijing, People's Republic of China; quwn{at}psych.ac.cn

Abstract

Objective To explore the impact of the dietary patterns of truck drivers on their driving behaviours and the mediation effect of fatigue between these factors.

Methods A sample of 389 male truck drivers from a transport company in Suzhou, China completed the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ), the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI), the Positive Driver Behaviours Scale (PDBS) and the Driver Behaviour Questionnaire (DBQ). The associations among dietary patterns, fatigue and driving behaviour were examined using pathway analysis.

Results Four dietary patterns were identified based on principal component analysis: animal-derived foods, staple foods, snacks and vegetables. The pathway analysis showed that the vegetable-rich pattern had a direct positive impact on positive driving behaviour (β=0.211, p<0.001); the animal-derived pattern had a direct positive impact on errors (β=0.094, p<0.05) and ordinary violations (β=0.071, p<0.05); the snacks pattern had a direct negative impact on positive driving behaviour (β=−0.191, p<0.001); fatigue mediated the effect of dietary patterns on driving behaviours (p<0.001); and the staple foods had an indirect effect on driving behaviours.

Conclusions Overall, the driving behaviours of truck drivers are correlated with their dietary patterns. Drivers who preferred vegetables and staple foods had more positive driving behaviour, while the animal-derived food and snack patterns were related to dangerous driving behaviour. The experience of fatigue could explained the underlying mechanism between these factors.

  • psychology
  • accidents
  • public health

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. If you need data, please contact us via gey@psych.ac.cn.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Data availability statement

Data are available upon reasonable request. If you need data, please contact us via gey@psych.ac.cn.

View Full Text

Footnotes

  • Contributors Conceived and designed the experiments: YG and WQ. Performed the experiments: YG and WQ. Analysed the data: SH. Data collecting: YX. Drafted the manuscript: SH and YG.

  • Funding This study was supported by grants from the National Key Research and Development Plan of China (2017YFB0802800) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 32071066, 32071064, U1736220, 71971073, 31771225).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.