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Original research
Occupational physical activity, not leisure-time physical activity, is associated with increased high-sensitivity C reactive protein levels
  1. Jongin Lee1,
  2. Hyoung-Ryoul Kim1,2,
  3. Tae-Won Jang3,
  4. Dong-Wook Lee4,
  5. Yu Min Lee1,
  6. Mo-Yeol Kang1,2
  1. 1 Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, Seocho-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  2. 2 Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  3. 3 Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  4. 4 Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  1. Correspondence to Dr Mo-Yeol Kang, Preventive medicine, Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; snaptoon{at}naver.com

Abstract

Objective This study aims to explore the association between physical activity and high-sensitivity C reactive protein, based on different types of physical activity—occupational and leisure time.

Methods Using cross-sectional data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2015–2018, we explored the association between different types of self-reported physical activity and high levels of high-sensitivity C reactive protein (>3 mg/L). We estimated the ORs for high-level high-sensitivity C reactive protein using multiple logistic regression models after adjusting for covariates from 12 970 eligible subjects (mean age 44.8).

Results Compared with subjects who did not engage in moderate-to-vigorous level of occupational physical activity (OPA), the group that engaged in moderate-to-vigorous level of OPA showed a significantly high OR (1.32, 95% CI (1.03 to 1.69)), whereas the group that engaged in moderate-to-vigorous level of leisure-time physical activity (LPA) yielded a low OR (0.84, 95% CI (0.69 to 1.01)). The group that engaged in moderate-to-vigorous level of OPA but not LPA showed a significantly high OR (1.76, 95% CI (1.27 to 2.45)) compared with subjects who engaged in moderate-to-vigorous level of LPA but not in OPA.

Conclusions OPA is directly associated with high C reactive protein levels, suggesting that it increases the risk of inflammation.

  • ergonomics
  • occupational health practice

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Footnotes

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  • Contributors JL made the study idea. JL conducted the statistical analysis and wrote the first draft. D-WL, M-YK, T-WJ, YML and H-RK interpreted the results and revised the reviewed the literature. M-YK and JL revised the manuscript. All authors have read and approved the final version of the submitted manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent for publication Not required.

  • Ethics approval Data collection was performed after approval by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of the Korean Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (approval number: 2018-01-03-P-A). This study was confirmed as an exemption of ethical review by the IRB of Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, the Catholic University of Korea (study number: KC20ZISI0159).

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Data availability statement Data are available in a public, open access repository. The data for this study were accessed through the KNHANES homepage (https://knhanes.cdc.go.kr/knhanes/eng/index.do).

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