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Ascertaining computer use in studies of musculoskeletal outcomes among computer workers: differences between self-report and computer registration software
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  • Published on:
    Response to "Does self-reported computer work add biologically relevant information beyond that of objectively recorded computer work?"

    We appreciate the careful reading of our editorial [1] by Drs. Mikkelsen and Andersen. We regret our omission of the one published NUDATA study available at the time our editorial was submitted [2]. That study reported significant associations between mouse usage time collected with memory resident software and both, acute neck pain and acute shoulder pain, among 2146 technical assistants. However, because i) median mouse...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Does self-reported computer work add biologically relevant information beyond that of objectively recorded computer work?

    In a recent editorial Gerr et al.[1] discuss computer work and musculoskeletal outcomes based on self-reported exposure versus objective recordings using computer software. They state that only one small study (n=27) using objective recordings was published before a large study by Ijmker et al.[2], published in the same issue as the editorial. They failed to consider the results of two NUDATA papers based on more than 2...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.