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Letter
Further corroboration of the asthmagenicity of 5-aminosalicylic acid
  1. Martin Seed,
  2. Raymond Agius
  1. Centre for Occupational & Environmental Health, Health Sciences Group, School of Community Based Medicine. Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
  1. Correspondence to Martin Seed, Centre for Occupational & Environmental Health, Health Sciences Group, School of Community Based Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, The University of Manchester, Room C4.20, Ellen Wilkinson Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK; martin.seed{at}manchester.ac.uk

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Sastre et al described a case of occupational asthma caused by a novel low molecular weight (LMW) respiratory sensitiser, 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA).1 They concluded that the mechanism was probably not IgE-mediated because of a negative skin prick test and a late response to bronchial challenge testing with 5-ASA. They remarked, as is the case with several other LMW asthmagens, that the mechanism by which 5-ASA caused asthma is unknown.

Such uncertainty, and likely heterogeneity, in the pathophysiological mechanisms of asthma due to LMW chemicals is one of the reasons why no single in vitro or in vivo testing method has been developed for the …

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Footnotes

  • Funding Funding was received for the initial development of this asthma hazard QSAR prediction model from the Colt Foundation who is also supporting its further development.

  • Ethics approval In this letter, we encourage physicians to consider using a computer-based prediction model to help them investigate the cause of clinical cases of occupational asthma where a novel chemical sensitiser is suspected. The use of this asthma hazard prediction programme to assist physicians in their clinical investigation of such cases has been approved for a formal evaluation in the UK by the University of Manchester Committee on the Ethics of Research on Human Beings. The North West NHS Research Ethics Committee deemed such work to be more akin to service evaluation rather than research and hence did not require formal ethical approval. We therefore do not anticipate any new ethical issues arising from the contents of this letter.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; not externally peer reviewed.

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