Responses

PDF
Occupational exposure to solvents and risk of lymphoma subtypes: results from the Epilymph case–control study
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

  • Published on:
    Re:Occupational exposure to solvents and risk of lymphoma subtypes: results from the Epilymph case-control study
    • Pierluigi Cocco, Associate Professor
    • Other Contributors:
      • Andrea t'Mannetje, Nikolaus Becker, Silvia de Sanjos?, Lenka Foretova, Julia Mareckova, Anthony Staines, Marc Maynadi?, Alexandra Nieters, Paul Brennan, and Paolo Boffetta.
    We thank Dr Triebig for his interesting comments on our article “Occupational exposure to solvents and risk of lymphoma subtypes: results from the Epilymph case-control study�.1,2 Epidemiological evidence is growing about the various etiological factors of specific lymphoma subtypes, and perhaps the different mechanisms involved.3 In our paper, we referred to previous reports suggesting an interaction o...
    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Occupational exposure to solvents and risk of lymphoma subtypes: results from the Epilymph case-control study

    Considering the temporal association between exposure to benzene and the later development of leukaemia it is questionable if this phenomena is also true for NHL.1 From several independent epidemiologic studies with consistent findings it can be concluded, that 10 to 15 years after exposure to benzene has been stopped, the risk of leukaemia is significantly less or even absent.2,3,4

    Assuming that the underlying...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.