Article Text

PDF

The effectiveness of ergonomic interventions on return-to-work after low back pain; a prospective two year cohort study in six countries on low back pain patients sicklisted for 3–4 months
  1. J R Anema1,
  2. B Cuelenaere2,
  3. A J van der Beek3,
  4. D L Knol5,
  5. H C W de Vet4,
  6. W van Mechelen3
  1. 1Body@Work, Research Centre Physical Activity, Work and Health, TNO-VU University Medical Centre, Netherlands
  2. 2AS/tri Research and Consultancy Group, Leiden, Netherlands
  3. 3Department of Social Medicine and Institute for Research in Extramural Medicine, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands
  4. 4Institute for Research in Extramural Medicine, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands
  5. 5Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and, Institute for Research in Extramural Medicine, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands
  1. Correspondence to:
 Dr J R Anema
 Occupational Physician, Body@Work, TNO-VU University Medical Centre, Van der Boechorststraat 7, 1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands; h.anemavumc.nl

Abstract

Aims: To study occurrence and effectiveness of ergonomic interventions on return-to-work applied for workers with low back pain (LBP).

Methods: A multinational cohort of 1631 workers fully sicklisted 3–4 months due to LBP (ICD-9 codes 721, 722, 724) was recruited from sickness benefit claimants databases in Denmark, Germany, Israel, Sweden, the Netherlands, and the United States. Medical, ergonomic, and other interventions, working status, and return-to-work were measured using questionnaires and interviews at three months, one and two years after the start of sickleave. Main outcome measure was time to return-to-work. Cox’s proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios regarding the time to return-to-work, adjusted for prognostic factors.

Results: Ergonomic interventions varied considerably in occurrence between the national cohorts: 23.4% (mean) of the participants reported adaptation of the workplace, ranging from 15.0% to 30.5%. Adaptation of job tasks and adaptation of working hours was applied for 44.8% (range 41.0–59.2%) and 46.0% (range 19.9–62.9%) of the participants, respectively. Adaptation of the workplace was effective on return-to-work rate with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.47 (95% CI 1.25 to 1.72; p < 0.0001). Adaptation of job tasks and adaptation of working hours were effective on return-to-work after a period of more than 200 days of sickleave with an adjusted HR of 1.78 (95% CI 1.42 to 2.23; p < 0.0001) and 1.41 (95% CI 1.13 to 1.76; p = 0.002), respectively.

Conclusions: Results suggest that ergonomic interventions are effective on return-to-work of workers long term sicklisted due to LBP.

  • back pain
  • disability management
  • ergonomics
  • multinational cohort study
  • return to work

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Funding: Social Security Supervisory Board, the Netherlands Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment and the Netherlands Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sports, with a grant from the General Disability Funds.

  • Competing interests: None declared

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.