eLetters

228 e-Letters

  • Environmental tobacco smoke and severe dementia syndromes
    Tomoyuki Kawada

    Chen et al [1] reported the positive association between environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and severe dementia syndromes. They mentioned that Cox regression model was applied to detect statistical significance.

    I have two queries on their study. First, they conducted cross- sectional study and Cox regression analysis was applied to detect relative risk by adjusting several confounders. They described the methodol...

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  • The effect of low cadmium exposure on renal biomarkers
    Tomoyuki Kawada

    Hambach et al [1] have published cross-sectional study on the associations between cadmium (Cd) exposure and renal or oxidative stress biomarkers in 36 solderers. They adopted multiple regression analysis to detect statistical significance with adjustment of age and pack-years of smoking. In contrast, there is a significant relationship between low levels of Cd exposure and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) [2,3], w...

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  • Blood lead levels in pregnant women in Nigeria: a cause for great concern
    Caroline M. Taylor

    We read the article by Njoku and Orisakwe comparing blood lead levels (BLL) in rural and urban pregnant women in Eastern Nigeria with great interest [1]. The authors found that BLL were substantially higher in rural areas than urban areas (135+/-160 vs 77+/-100 ug/dl). This in itself is an important finding: it may reflect a stronger reliance on locally grown foodstuffs in rural areas, combined with the effect of lead expo...

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  • Cadmium, arsenic and lung cancer: A complete picture?
    Tom Sorahan

    The Editor Occupational and Environmental Medicine

    14th September, 2012

    Cadmium, arsenic and lung cancer: A complete picture?

    Were the occupational lung cancers among former employees at the cadmium recovery plant located near Denver, CO, USA due to cadmium exposures, arsenic exposures or both? One of us recently suggested that a "simultaneous analysis of lung cancer risks in relation to both...

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  • Re:The study of the relation between maternal occupational exposure to solvents and birth defects should include oxygenated solvents (authors' response)
    Tania A. Desrosiers

    We appreciate the interest of Dr. Garlantezec and colleagues in our article on the association between maternal occupational exposure to organic solvents (chlorinated, aromatic and Stoddard) and birth defects. We reported a positive association between chlorinated solvents and neural tube defects, particularly spina bifida; we did not observe an association between solvent exposure and orofacial clefts.

    As noted...

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  • The study of the relation between maternal occupational exposure to solvents and birth defects should include oxygenated solvents
    Ronan Garlantezec

    We read with interest the report by Desrosiers et al of the association between maternal occupational exposure to organic solvents and some birth defects [1]. Their case-control study examined occupational exposure to three classes of solvents (chlorinated, aromatic and Stoddard) and found one association -- between neural tube defects (mainly spinal bifida) and maternal occupational exposure to chlorinated solvents, but n...

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  • Re:Response to "Health benefits of traffic-related air pollution reduction in different socioeconomic groups: the effect of low-emission zoning in Rome." Cesaroni et al. 69:133-139 doi:10.1136/oem.2010.063750
    Giulia Cesaroni

    Dear Editor,

    We thanks Barratt and colleagues for their comments. We agree that "care should be taken to validate model estimates with empirical measurements wherever possible". Barratt and colleagues cite two stations from the European Environment Agency database as located in the Railway Ring and they report increasing NO2 concentrations from 2001 to 2005. However, one station (IT0953A) is actually located i...

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  • Occupational Dermatitis
    Chris J Kalman

    It is good to see some scientific rigour applied in this important area. It is interesting to note however that there is no definition of occupational dermatitis. It is a reportable and prescribed disease in the UK, and can cause major impact on workers who suffer from it, but the question is whether healthcare workers who have perhaps a period of dry skin managed with ease, should be regarded has suffering from an occu...

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  • Response to "Health benefits of traffic-related air pollution reduction in different socioeconomic groups: the effect of low-emission zoning in Rome." Cesaroni et al. 69:133-139 doi:10.1136/oem.2010.063750
    Ben M Barratt
    Dear Editor,

    Cesaroni et al make an assessment of the health benefits of a traffic management scheme in Rome based on changes in vehicle emissions and associated chronic risk factors(1). The authors estimate that a combination of the policy intervention and unrelated fleet changes caused a 38% reduction in the annual mean exposure of NO2 and a 29% reduction of PM10 within the 'railway ring' restricted zone bet...
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  • Response to "The effect of high temperatures on cause-specific mortality in England and Wales." Gasparrini et al. 69:56-61 doi:10.1136/oem.2010.059782
    Tom Loney

    Dear Editor,

    High temperatures and mortality - even more relevant in desert environments.

    Your editorial on exposure to high ambient temperatures and mortality is timely [1]. The Gasparrini et al.[2] paper on ambient air temperatures and mortality in temperate England and Wales provides further support for population-level preventive measures to reduce the likelihood of adverse health effects from elev...

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