eLetters

80 e-Letters

published between 2003 and 2006

  • Authors' Reply to Erren et al.
    Alessandro Marinaccio

    Mortality results in workers compensated for silicosis in Italy by job and disability degree.

    We wish to thank our German colleagues for giving us the opportunity to clear some points of the mortality study of workers compensated for silicosis in Italy [1]. The large number of silicotic compensated workers investigated allowed us to perform specific analyses to reduce cohort heterogeneity. Subcohort has been i...

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  • Finnish hardwood
    Heikki Savolainen

    Dear Editor,

    The absence of a significant nasal and ethmoid sinus cancer risk in Finland may be due to the low concentrations of polyphenols in domestic tree species as compared to imported wood from from more southern regions (1). The determination of the polyphenol content could be a good chemical surrogate for the detection of the species with carcinogenic properties (2).

    1 Mämmelä P, Phenolics in...

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  • Reactive Stress Disease
    David S. David

    I enjoyed reading the study of Huizink et al(1)about the Amsterdam air disaster. As pointed out in their table 2, airway disease was one of the symptoms found to be more prevalent in the exposed group. Reactive airway disease can develop after a single large exposure to an irritant. This type of injury has also been noted in the nasal airway. One of the reasons the reactivity persists for many years or never goes awa...

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  • Nickel related lung cancer: confounding a minor problem
    Tom K. Grimsrud

    Dear Editor,

    I thank Andrews and Heller for showing an interest in nickel related lung cancer in their electronic letter of 7 July 2006.[1] A large body of evidence exists on the link between nickel exposure and lung cancer. Among the most informative occupational cohorts were the one from Clydach, South Wales (where the risk was first observed); several cohorts of Canadian nickel workers; and the refinery cohort...

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  • Re: TCE exposure and NHL - supportive evidence
    Jeffrey H. Mandel

    (author response)

    We appreciate the interest in our recent meta-analysis of occupational trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure and non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (NHL)(1). Three criticisms were mentioned as, “serious limitations”: 1) that the alternative descriptions of the Group I occupational cohort studies (multiple industry vs. aerospace, incidence vs. mortality and Europe vs. U.S. studies) should have been characteri...

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  • Mortality results in workers compensated for silicosis in Italy - Facts and possible artefacts
    Thomas C. Erren

    Mortality results in a large cohort of workers compensated for silicosis in Italy – Facts and possible artefacts

    With interest we read the article by Marinaccio et al. [1]. Their retrospective mortality study of some 14.000 men compensated for silicosis in the Tuscany region would constitute a powerful addition to studies of cancer risks in compensated silicotics worldwide. In particular, some study results could c...

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  • Reproductive effects of occupational exposure in painters
    Heikki Savolainen

    Dear Editor,

    This carefully conducted investigation confirms the idea that paternally mediated reproductive effects are possible in the painting trades (1,2).

    Perhaps, a better indicator of exposure than toluene and its metabolites would be the use of urinary alkoxyacetic acids which stem from aliphatic ethylene glycol ethers typically used in modern water miscible paints (3) and which are confirmed t...

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  • TCE exposure and NHL - supportive evidence
    Daniel Wartenberg

    Dear Editor,

    Mandel and colleagues' article on trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) provides an interesting review of relevant studies although it has serious limitations (1).

    First, there are three alternative descriptions of their stratification of Group 1 studies: population source (multiple industries vs. only aerospace), outcome (incidence vs. mortality) and location (...

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  • Smoking and lung cancer risk in Clydach nickel refinery report
    David F. Andrews

    Dear Editor,

    The authors conclude that 'there was evidence of a persisting risk among process workers first employed since 1953' in the Clydach, South Wales, refinery. Unfortunately, they were unable to incorporate the confounding influence of such well-known predictors of health as attained education, income level and smoking status. An analysis of their data, stratified finely by smoking status, would yield use...

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  • Organic dust and lowered cancer rates: a dose-response relationship
    John H. Lange

    Dear Editor,

    The paper by Laakkonen et al., (1) reported a lower than expected rate of lung cancer in textile workers for men and women. The data in this study, as has been previously reported (2), suggest that a dose- response relationship exists for increasing cotton textile dust and lowered lung cancer rates. I would like to make several comments regarding this excellent report on dust exposure and respirator...

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