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Letter
Response to: ‘Psychosocial job stressors and suicidality: a meta-analysis and systematic review’ by Milner et al
  1. BongKyoo Choi1,2,3
  1. 1Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, USA
  2. 2Environmental Health Sciences Graduate Program, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, USA
  3. 3Program in Public Health, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, USA
  1. Correspondence to Professor BongKyoo Choi, Department of Medicine, Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92617, USA; b.choi{at}uci.edu

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I read with great interest the meta-analysis paper by Milner et al1 about the associations between psychosocial job stressors and suicidality in working populations. The authors have compiled  and investigated 22 epidemiological studies on chronic job stressors (job control, job demands, job strain, colleague/supervisor support, effortreward imbalance, job insecurity, role conflict and working hours/shift work) and suicide ideation/death in the literature, which is a very timely and important review that will contribute to the primary prevention …

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