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Injury at work and migrant workers: a priority for a global agenda in occupational health
  1. Emily Q Ahonen1,2,
  2. Fernando G Benavides3
  1. 1Department of Environmental Health Science, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA
  2. 2Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA
  3. 3Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Centre for Research in Occupational Health (CiSAL), Pompeu Fabra University, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, Barcelona, Spain
  1. Correspondence to Professor Fernando G Benavides, Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Centre for Research in Occupational Health (CiSAL), Pompeu Fabra University, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health, CiSAL-Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Doctor Aiguader 88, Barcelona, 08003, Spain; fernando.benavides{at}upf.edu

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Occupational health professionals are aware that patterns of occupational injury vary across population groups. The study by Biering et al1 contributes to this discussion by examining the incidence of occupational injury in non-native workers compared to Danish workers. The authors report elevated adjusted rate ratios for injury in foreign-born workers from certain regions of the world, in certain industries, and in certain age groups. Analysis using different combinations of variables shows that rates were elevated in foreign-born workers from countries recently admitted to the European Union, from Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America (‘other’ countries), and in those above 30 of age. Rates of injury were also raised in foreign-born workers who have been in Denmark for 3 years or less compared to foreign-born workers with longer residence (assumed to be more integrated into society) and to Danes. Analyses combining all study variables indicated injury rates were highest among workers aged over 30 from the new European Union nations and ‘other’ countries, and employed in sectors categorised as low risk by the authors. Thus, …

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