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Carpal tunnel syndrome and its relationship with occupation and sex: from objective evaluation to patients' care
  1. Daniele Coraci1,2,
  2. Marina A Bellavia3,4,
  3. LisaD Hobson-Webb5,
  4. Valter Santilli1,6,
  5. Luca Padua2,7
  1. 1Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Department of Orthopaedic Science, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy
  2. 2Don Carlo Gnocchi ONLUS Foundation, Milan, Italy
  3. 3Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro, Italy
  4. 4Regional Epilepsy Center, Bianchi-Melacrino-Morelli Hospital, Reggio Calabria, Italy
  5. 5Department of Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA
  6. 6Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Unit, Azienda Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, Italy
  7. 7Department of Geriatrics, Neurosciences and Orthopaedics, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy
  1. Correspondence to Professor Luca Padua, Don Carlo Gnocchi ONLUS Foundation, P le Morandi, 6, Milan 20121, Italy; luca.padua{at}unicatt.it

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‘Exposure–response relationships between movements and postures of the wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome among male and female house painters: a retrospective cohort study’, by Heilskov-Hansen et al,1 is a welcome addition to the carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) literature. The authors explored relations between incidence of CTS and wrist movements, wrist postures and sex. They discovered a higher incidence related to velocity of wrist movements and frequency of repetitions, but no cumulative effect. Furthermore, the paper showed an absolute higher CTS incidence …

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