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Household solid fuel use and pulmonary function in an urban population in Shanghai, China
  1. Mi-Sun Lee1,
  2. Jing-qing Hang2,
  3. Feng-ying Zhang2,
  4. Bu-yong Zheng2,
  5. Li Su1,
  6. Yang Zhao1,
  7. He-lian Dai2,
  8. Hong-xi Zhang2,
  9. David C Christiani1,3
  1. 1Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology Program, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  2. 2Shanghai Putuo District People's Hospital, Shanghai, China
  3. 3The Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr David C Christiani, Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology Program, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Ave, Building I Room 1401, Boston, MA 02115, USA; dchris{at}hsph.harvard.edu

Abstract

Objectives We examined the association between household solid fuel exposure and lung function in a densely populated district in urban Shanghai, China.

Methods Spirometry was performed in 12 506 subjects, aged 18 and over, residing in the Putuo District in Shanghai, China, in a cross-sectional survey. Exposure to solid fuel use at home was assessed by an administered questionnaire, estimating duration and total amount of solid fuel use at home during the lifetime.

Results After adjusting for confounders, the subjects with exposure to household solid fuel had a 1.3% (95% CI 0.57 to 2.02) decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) percent predicted and 3.5% (95% CI 2.74 to 4.18) decrease in forced vital capacity (FVC) percent predicted, respectively. Trends towards decreased pulmonary function measures were seen for longer duration and greater amount of household fuel use at home, in the highest compared with lowest tertile (p values for trend <0.001). We observed decrease in FEV1 and FVC percent predicted across increase in tertile of body mass index in association with in-home solid fuel exposure.

Conclusions This study suggests that in-home solid fuel exposure is associated with reduced lung function in an urban population.

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