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Higher blood lead levels in rural than urban pregnant women in Eastern Nigeria
  1. Chinwendu Onyekachi Njoku1,
  2. Orish Ebere Orisakwe2
  1. 1Department of Medical Lab Science, Faculty of Science, Rivers State University of Science and Technology Port Harcourt Rivers State Nigeria, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
  2. 2Toxicology Unit, Faculty of Pharmacy University of Port Harcourt Rivers State Nigeria, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
  1. Correspondence to Professor Orish Ebere Orisakwe, Toxicology Unit, Faculty of Pharmacy University of Port Harcourt Rivers State Nigeria, Port Harcourt, Nigeria; eorish{at}aol.com

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While blood lead levels (BLLs) in many western countries have progressively declined over the years, in Nigeria, high BLLs continue to be documented not only in exposed workers but also in ‘unexposed’ subjects.1 Lead is an environmental toxin that is capable of causing numerous acute and chronic illnesses. Pregnant women with elevated BLLs transfer lead to the fetus since blood-borne lead crosses the placenta. Through a consideration of the joint associations of maternal BLLs, demographics, obstetrics variables and plasma enzymes levels, this study has attempted to provide data required for crafting effective public health information with …

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