Article Text

other Versions

PDF
Field protection effectiveness of chemical protective suits and gloves evaluated by biomonitoring
  1. Fu-Kuei Chang
  1. Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taiwan
    1. Mei-Lien Chen
    1. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taiwan
      1. Shu-Fang Cheng
      1. Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Council of Labor Affairs, Executive Yuan, Taiwan
        1. Tung-Sheng Shih
        1. Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Council of Labor Affairs, Executive Yuan, Taiwan
          1. I-Fang Mao (ifmao{at}ym.edu.tw)
          1. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, College of Medicine, National Yang Ming University, Taiwan

            Abstract

            Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of protective suits and gloves by biomonitoring. Methods: Fifteen male spray painters at a ship coating factory were studied for two weeks. Workers wore no protective clothing during the first week and wore protective suits and gloves during the second week. Sampling was conducted on four consecutive working days each week. Ethyl benzene and xylene in the air were collected by using 3M 3500 organic vapor monitors. Urine was collected before and after each work shift. Results: Urinary mandelic acid (MA) and methyl hippuric acid (MHA) levels were divided by the personal exposure concentrations of ethyl benzene and xylene, respectively. Corrected MA and MHA concentrations in the first week were 1.07¡&Oacute0.18 (mean¡&OacuteSE) and 2.66 ¡&Oacute0.68 (mg/g creatinine)/(mg/m3), and concentrations in the second week were 0.50¡&Oacute0.12 and 1.76¡&Oacute0.35 (mg/g creatinine)/(mg/m3) in the second week, respectively. Both MA and MHA concentrations in the second week when spray painters wore protective suits and gloves were lower than in the first week, respectively (p < 0.001, p = 0.011). Mean decrease in MA and MHA biomarkers were 69 % and 49 %, respectively. Conclusion: This study successfully evaluated the effectiveness of chemical protective suits and gloves by using biomarkers as urinary MA and MHA. This method is feasible for determining the performance of workers wearing personal protective equipment. Moreover, the experimental results suggest that dermal exposure may be the major contributor to total body burden of solvents in spray painters without protective suits and gloves.

            • biomarker
            • chemical protective suits and gloves
            • field protection effectiveness
            • spray painter

            Statistics from Altmetric.com

            Request permissions

            If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.