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Letter
New standard for assessing asbestos exposure and its consequences?
  1. L Christine Oliver1,
  2. Laura Welch2,
  3. Arthur L Frank3,
  4. Richard A Lemen4,
  5. Luciano Mutti5
  1. 1 Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Occupational Health Initiatives, Inc, Brookline, Massachusetts, USA
  2. 2 Center for Construction Research and Training, Washington DC, USA
  3. 3 Drexel University School of Public Health, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
  4. 4 Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
  5. 5 University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr L Christine Oliver, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Occupational Health Initiatives, Inc, 1101 Beacon Street, Ste 8 East, Brookline, MA 02446, USA; coliver{at}ohiinc.com

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Comment

Bofetta and La Vecchia1, in their commentary, state that ‘The paper by Gilham et al, published in Occupational and Environmental Medicine, is important for a number of methodological and substantive reasons…’.2 In fact, there are methodological and substantive flaws in the paper that call into question the study results and authors' conclusions.2

  1. The authors rely on occupational history as a key point of reference in asbestos exposure assessment. Lifetime occupational history was obtained through telephone interviews of patients with malignant mesothelioma and from general population and lung cancer controls. The implication is that these interviews were conducted directly with study subjects. However, the authors state that informed consent for …

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