rss
Occup Environ Med 68:474-478 doi:10.1136/oem.2010.055681
  • Original article
  • Workplace

Cardiac autonomic dysfunction from occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

  1. David C Christiani
  1. Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology Program, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr David C Christiani, Environmental and Occupational Medicine and Epidemiology Program, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Ave, Building I Room 1401, Boston, MA 02115, USA; dchris{at}hsph.harvard.edu
  • Accepted 27 September 2010
  • Published Online First 16 December 2010

Abstract

Objectives Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been associated with cardiopulmonary mortality and cardiovascular events. This study investigated the association between a biological marker of PAH exposure, assessed by urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), and heart-rate variability in an occupational cohort of boilermakers.

Methods Continuous 24 h monitoring of the ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) and pre- and postshift urinary 1-OHP were repeated over extended periods of the work week. Mixed-effects models were fitted for the 5 min SD of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) in relation to urinary 1-OHP levels pre- and postworkshift on the day they wore the monitor, controlling for potential confounders.

Results The authors found a significant decrease in 5 min SDNN during work of −13.6% (95% CI −17.2% to −9.8%) per SD (0.53 μg/g creatinine) increase in the next-morning preshift 1-OHP levels. The magnitude of reduction in 5 min SDNN was largest during the late night period after work and increased with each SD (0.46 μg/g creatinine) increase in postshift 1-OHP levels.

Conclusion This is the first report providing evidence that occupational exposure to PAHs is associated with altered cardiac autonomic function. Acute exposure to PAHs may be an important predictor of cardiovascular disease risk in the work environment.

Footnotes

  • Funding This work was supported by National Institutes of Health grants R01ES9860 and ES000002.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Ethics approval Ethics approval was provided by the Institutional Review Board of the Harvard School of Public Health.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Free sample

This recent issue is free to all users to allow everyone the opportunity to see the full scope and typical content of OEM.
View free sample issue >>

Don't forget to sign up for content alerts so you keep up to date with all the articles as they are published.

Navigate This Article