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Chemicals in the environment and human male fertility
  1. Nicolas Olea,
  2. Mariana F Fernandez
  1. Lab Medical Investigations, Hospital S Cecilio-University of Granada, Granada, Spain
  1. Correspondence to:
 Dr N Olea
 Lab Medical Investigations, Hospital S Cecilio-University of Granada, Granada, 18071 Spain; nolea{at}ugr.es

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Study shows that progressive replacement of some chemical components may have a beneficial effect on semen quality

In an article published in this issue (see page 467), Luc Multigner and colleagues1 show that male exposure to short-chain glycol ethers has long-lasting negative effects on semen quality. Occupational exposure to chemicals in the workplace and their effects on testicular functions and male fertility is not a novel observation. Over the past few decades, investigations into the professional exposure of men have provided convincing evidence on the association between exposure to particular types of chemicals and male reproductive disorders.2 This study reveals that precautionary measures focused on the progressive replacement of some chemical compounds by others may have a beneficial effect on semen quality.

In contrast to the relative consensus achieved around occupational chemical exposure, strong disagreements have arisen between supporters and opponents of the role of environmental chemicals in the decline in sperm production and quality …

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