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Respiratory
  1. F. E. Greven1,
  2. F. Duijm1,
  3. H. A. M. Kerstjens2,
  4. D. Heederik3,
  5. F. E. Greven1
  1. 1Municipal Health Service
  2. 2Department of Pulmonology, University Medical Center
    Groningen
  3. 3IRAS Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Utrecht University
    1. E. Meijer1,
    2. E. Suarthana1,
    3. K. G. M. Moons2,
    4. J. de Monchy3,
    5. T. Meijster1,
    6. D. Heederik1
    1. 1Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University
    2. 2Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht
    3. 3Department of Allergology, University Medical Center
      Groningen

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      127 RESPIRATORY SEQUELAE FOLLOWING A FIRE AT A CHEMICAL WASTE DEPOT

      Objectives:

      In May 2000 480 tons of chemical waste were burnt at a hazardous waste disposal site and dispersed smoke and other combustion products over a large area to the west of the town of Drachten, The Netherlands. The objectives of this study are: first, to evaluate whether reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) occurs among the examined subjects; second, to evaluate if the RADS can be attributed to the ATF fire.

      Methods:

      Because there was still concern among some of the public and workers involved in the incident, an aetiological study was undertaken in 2006. Because the results of a previously self-administered questionnaire demonstrated that RADS was a possible sequela of exposure to the smoke, the study focused on RADS and started with an interview by telephone using a standardised questionnaire. This was followed by a medical survey of 25 possible cases and 50 randomly sampled controls. Subjects meeting predefined criteria enrolled in a medical examination that consisted of spirometry, histamine challenge tests, laboratory tests and a chest x ray. In a subsample induced sputum has been assessed. Exposure was considered high if the distance to the fire was up to 100 m, intermediate from 100 to 1000 m and low beyond 1000 m.

      Results:

      Preliminary results show an odds ratio (95% CI) of 4.3 (1.5 to 11.8) for cases and controls of the interview. This odds ratio increased to 14.0 (2.8 to 70.8) when analysis was restricted to cases of lung physician diagnosis of possible RADS.

      Conclusion:

      Indications were found of an association between exposure and respiratory symptoms indicative of RADS. The likelihood of selection and other biases will be discussed and balanced against the results of the medical survey.

      Key words:

      respiratory effects; combustion products; police officers

      128 A DIAGNOSTIC MODEL TO PREDICT THE PROBABILITY OF SENSITISATION TO WHEAT ALLERGENS AMONG BAKERS

      Objectives:

      In The Netherlands, the baking and flour producing industries agreed on developing a health surveillance system to …

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