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Interventions
  1. T. L. Guidotti1,
  2. R. Bertera1,
  3. L. Abroms1,
  4. L. Ford2
  1. 1George Washington University
  2. 2(formerly) University of Alberta
    1. A. L. Schoenfisch1,
    2. L. A. Pompeii2,
    3. D. J. Myers1,
    4. H. J. Lipscomb1
    1. 1Duke University Medical Center
    2. 2University of Texas School of Public Health

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      103 THE FORT MCMURRAY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT IN SOCIAL MARKETING

      Objectives:

      The Fort McMurray Demonstration Project in Social Marketing attempted to achieve mutually reinforcing effects from thematically coordinated educational and awareness efforts in the community as a whole and in the workplace and the inclusion of occupational safety within the framework of a community health promotion project.

      Methods:

      The project was conducted in a small, industrial city in northern Alberta and was modelled on several existing programs in Scandinavian cities. The project relied heavily on community-based partners and participants coordinating safety promotion with workplace education and reinforcement of safe behaviours. Data on healthcare utilisation of selected preventable injuries were obtained from Alberta Health for the time period 1990 to 1996 for the Regional Health Authorities containing the communities of Fort McMurray (Northern Lights) and the city of Grande Prairie (Mistahia), a reference community.

      Results:

      Limited evidence suggested a possible sustained effect for fractures and a transient effect for dislocations but not other injury types. Preliminary data will also be shared on intermediate outcome measures associated with behavioural change. Process measures, by contrast, showed great impact on the community.

      Conclusion:

      The Fort McMurray Demonstration Project in Social Marketing achieved an intensity of intervention and community participation that is unlikely to be sustainable in other communities. However, there is no evidence that the intervention changed safety-related behaviour in the community. The community may already have achieved saturation in safety awareness or the project as implemented may have been too diffuse in presenting the safety message. The results closely replicate the experience of most similar demonstration projects initiated in the 1980s and 1990s, especially several in Scandinavia. Other methodological approaches are needed.

      Key words:

      health promotion; safety; workplace

      104 IMPLEMENTATION AND ADOPTION OF A “MINIMAL-MANUAL LIFT ENVIRONMENT” PROGRAM ON INPATIENT NURSING UNITS AT TWO HOSPITALS

      Objectives:

      We report intermediate measures of program adoption at two hospitals that, as part of a stated policy shift to a “minimal-manual lift environment”, allocated funds to provide patient lift equipment and …

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