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Surveillance of occupational disease
  1. V. Bonneterre1,
  2. D. J. Bicout1,
  3. L. Larabi2,
  4. A. Maitre1,
  5. P. Tubert-Bitter3,
  6. R. de Gaudemaris1
  1. 1
    Laboratoire Environnement et Prédiction de la Santé des Populations – TIMC, Grenoble, France
  2. 2Occupational Medicine Department, Grenoble University Hospital
  3. 3
    Inserm U 472, Hôpital Paul Brousse, Villejuif

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    068 DETECTION OF EMERGING DISEASES IN OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH: USEFULNESS AND LIMITATIONS OF APPLICATION OF PHARMACOVIGILANCE METHODS TO THE DATABASE OF THE FRENCH NATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE SURVEILLANCE AND PREVENTION NETWORK (RNV3P)

    Objectives:

    Early detection of new disease–occupational nuisance associations is an important health issue. The French national occupational disease surveillance and prevention network database (RNV3P, for Réseau National de Vigilance et Prévention des Pathologies Professionnelles) was created in 2001 to monitor occupational and environmental diseases. One of its aims is to develop statistical methods or models to detect potentially emerging associations between diseases and nuisances. The aim of this work is to test data mining methods used in pharmacovigilance in order to identify potential emerging disease–nuisance associations (DNA) in the RNV3P.

    Methods:

    Application to the RNV3P database of safety data mining methods used in pharmacovigilance. These methods analyse drug–event pairs which are the equivalent of the disease–occupational nuisance pairs or associations included in the RNV3P and generate a statistical signal when there is a discrepancy between the true number of pairs reported and the expected number for this same pair in the database. DNA which do not yet give entitlement to compensation and which generate a signal with these methods are pointed out as “potentially emergent” associations.

    Results:

    The 24 785 reports of the RNV3P were grouped into 1344 different DNA reported more than twice, of which 422 did not give entitlement to compensation by the social security system. Among these DNA, 162 were “potentially emergent” and generated a signal, in particular eight associations involving cancer. These formerly “unrecognised” DNA, reported several times by the network, originate either from potential toxicological problems (associations where the relationship of cause to effect is not yet established), or from problems of social recognition: work-related health disorders which do not yet give entitlement to compensation.

    Conclusion:

    This work is a preliminary step towards automated systematic analysis …

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