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Mass concentration and elemental composition of PM10 in classrooms.
  1. N A Janssen,
  2. G Hoek,
  3. B Brunekreef,
  4. H Harssema
  1. Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Wageningen, The Netherlands. Nicole.Janssen@Staff.eoh.wau.nl

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the sources of high concentrations of particles of < 10 microns diameter (PM10) in classrooms, observed in a previous study on childhood exposure to PM10, and to study the correlation between classroom and outdoor concentrations of mass and elements of PM10. METHODS: Measurements of PM10 were conducted in two schools and outdoors in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Averaging time was 24 hours for the outdoor measurements and both 8 hours (school time) and 24 hours for the classroom measurements. Analysis by x ray fluorescence was used to measure the elemental composition of 55 samples from the 11 days when measurements were conducted simultaneously in both classrooms and outdoors. RESULTS: For most elements, classroom concentrations were considerably higher than outdoor concentrations, especially during school hours. The highest classroom/outdoor ratios were found for the elements from soils Si, Ca, and Ti. The only measured elements that were not increased were S, Br, Pb, and Cl, which are dominated by non-crustal sources. For S, Br, and Pb, which are generally associated with particles < 1 micron, significant correlations between classroom and outdoor concentrations and between the two classrooms were found. The other elements generally had low correlations. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that the high PM10 concentrations found in our classrooms are probably due to resuspension of coarse particles or suspension of soil material. Due to these excess coarse particles, the correlation between classroom and outdoor concentrations is lower for elements associated with coarse particles than for elements associated with fine particles. As the general composition of PM10 in classrooms differs from the composition of PM10 in ambient air, the high PM10 mass concentrations in classrooms can probably not be directly compared with ambient air quality guidelines.

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