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Epidemiological study of hard metal asthma.
  1. Y Kusaka,
  2. M Iki,
  3. S Kumagai,
  4. S Goto
  1. Department of Environmental Health, Fukui Medical School, Matsuoka-cho, Japan.

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVES: To elucidate factors contributing to hard metal asthma, the entire workforce of a corporation producing hard metal tools (n = 703) was examined. METHODS: The variables evaluated were the atopy reflected by immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibody against mite allergen, history of exposure to hard metal, smoking, concentration of airborne cobalt, specific IgE antibody reaction against cobalt, and the respiratory symptom of attacks of reversible dyspnoea with wheeze (asthmatic symptoms). RESULTS: Univariate analysis showed that the prevalence of the asthmatic symptoms was significantly higher in formerly and currently exposed male workers than in non-exposed male workers. Positive IgE reaction against cobalt was found in seven men (2.0%), all of whom had asthmatic symptoms. Furthermore, it was found that atopy, positive IgE antibody against cobalt, and age of 40 or older were significantly correlated with asthmatic symptoms. Multilogistic analysis on the same factors and smoking in all of the workers showed that the age, experience of hard metal exposure, and atopy were significant risk factors associated with the asthmatic symptoms. Multilogistic analysis of data for currently exposed and non-exposed workers also showed that age and atopy were risk factors, and that the exposure to cobalt at the low concentration (at or below 50 micrograms/m3) but not at the higher concentration was a significant risk factor. Exposure to mist of coolants containing ionic cobalt, used during grinding, was not found to be any more hazardous in terms of onset of asthmatic symptoms than exposure to hard metal dust containing metallic cobalt. CONCLUSIONS: Accordingly, it is concluded that both environmental factors and individual susceptibility should be taken into consideration in efforts to reduce the prevalence of hard metal asthma.

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